Tag Archives: consumer bankruptcy data

Consumer Debt Going Up

U.S. consumer debt grew in February by the most in seven months with a rise in non-revolving loans, prior to the coronavirus pandemic.

Federal Reserve figures showed a $22.3 billion increase in total credit from the prior month.  Non-revolving debt, which includes auto and school loans, rose by $18.1 billion — the most since 2015 — while revolving or credit-card debt was up $4.2 billion.

The pandemic has quickly spawned financial hardships for many in the US. Uncertain incomes means that consumers are likely to begin to cut back on purchases and borrow less.

Household credit has been expanding over the past few years at about the same pace as it was prior to the 2007-2009 recession.

Nearly 40 Percent of Americans Plan to Use Stimulus to Pay Debt

720 System Strategies surveyed more than 80,000  students in their credit-score improvement program, many of whom lost thousands of income dollars due to the Corona-virus. 34.95 percent plan to spend their one-time stimulus check and twelve-week unemployment benefits on paying down debt.

In a recent Yahoo! Finance blog, CEO and Founder of 720 System Strategies, Philip Tirone is predicting that the number of 2020 Consumer Bankruptcies will skyrocket past the 2010 high of 1.5 million.

2020 Auto Trends – Download upgrades to your car

Automakers must invest in upgrades to the digital platforms within new cars. Earlier this year, BMW introduced a wireless service for some of its models. Just like regular software updates, the new service keeps the operating system up-to-date with the latest version.

This new service includes an intelligent personal assistant that can be expanded automatically and OTA (Over The Air).

Some other manufacturers also offer wireless OTA software updates that include Tesla, Audi, Volvo, and Ford. Most have updates that are focused on non-critical infotainment features or offed new applications and functions for the infotainment system.

 

2020 Auto Trends – Increased Presence of Electric Cars

Manufacturers continue to plow forward to meet the 2025 CAFE (Corporate Average Fuel Economy) standards.  Ramping up electric car sales is on the forefront. Be prepared to see lots more Electric Vehicles starting in 2020, for example:

 

BK is going gray

The social safety net for older Americans has been shrinking for the past 20 years or so. Reduced income, and increased healthcare costs, are now financial risks associated with aging. A new trend is emerging, older Americans are increasingly likely to file consumer bankruptcy. Using data from the Consumer Bankruptcy Project, the SSRN (Social Science Research Network) reported finding more than a two-fold increase in the rate at which Americans aged 65 and over file for bankruptcy.  Also reported, an almost five-fold increase in the percentage of older persons in the U.S. bankruptcy system. The magnitude of growth in older Americans in bankruptcy is so large that the broader trend of an aging U.S. population can explain only a small portion of the effect. The SSRN data indicates that older Americans report they are struggling with increased financial risks, namely inadequate income and unmanageable costs of healthcare, as they try to deal with reductions to their social safety net. As a result of these increased financial burdens, the median senior bankruptcy filer enters bankruptcy with negative wealth of $17,390 as compared to more than $250,000 for their non-bankrupt peers. For an increasing number of older Americans, their golden years are fraught with economic risks, the result of which is often bankruptcy.

Read more here.

BK Climbing in 2019

Is the trend of declining bankruptcy filings coming to an end?  There are some key indicators that suggest it.

A 2019 report from the American Bankruptcy Institute (ABI) indicates that consumer bankruptcy filings are on track to increase notably for the first time in years. The ABI shows that total U.S. bankruptcy filings increased 3% in July from the previous July; consumer bankruptcy filings increased at the same 3 percent rate year-to-year, with 61,025 consumer filings in July 2019, up from 59,110 in July 2018. Consumer bankruptcies also rose about 5 percent month to month from June to July 2019 (from 58,003 to 61,025).

The New York Post noted that if the trend continues, the overall total of [personal and business] bankruptcies is on pace to hit 796,000 which far exceeds last year’s totals.

Data from the ABI suggests that household debt is roughly $14 trillion, which is $1 trillion more than the 2008 Great Recession peak.  Credit card debt is $1 trillion and also exceeds the 2008 peak, which could make households more likely to turn to bankruptcy as a means of relief moving forward.

Point of Sale Lending

Six Major Trends in Lending for Financial Marketers this Year

The forecast for most forms of consumer credit is good. Lending volume, growth in balances, and overall performance look upbeat for the year ahead. Banks and credit unions will try new marketing strategies, explore new products, and experiment with new technologies. Over the next six-weeks, we’ll review major trends in consumer lending that financial marketers should watch closely.

#5 Point of Sale Lending

Building a marketing plan for digital lending has multiple facets. One early decision that Martin says lenders must make is who their ideal personal loan candidate is. Another key aspect is building repeat customer business. For that, attention must be paid to the post-approval digital experience.

According to Martin, another wrinkle is that traditional lenders are exploring ways to put their products right at the point of sale, embedding them in some fashion with the purchasing process. A model being looked at is that of Affirm, which makes installment loans for purchases at the digital point of sale. (Affirm works with fintech ally Cross River Bank, which books the loans.)

Martin says additional firms have started up in this space. One is Bread, which also works with Cross River Bank. Another is GreenSky Credit, a fintech which specializes in point of sale home improvement and healthcare finance, among other needs, in partnership with multiple banks.

“Co-branded deals like that are hot,” says Martin.

Read more here

Unsecured Personal Loans

Six Major Trends in Lending for Financial Marketers this Year

The forecast for most forms of consumer credit is good. Lending volume, growth in balances, and overall performance look upbeat for the year ahead. Banks and credit unions will try new marketing strategies, explore new products, and experiment with new technologies. Over the next six-weeks, we’ll review major trends in consumer lending that financial marketers should watch closely.

#4 Unsecured Personal Loans in Digital Channels 

Unsecured consumer lending has had growing appeal to banking providers, and more of it may be executed through fintech partnerships. In late October 2018, for example, HSBC Bank announced that it would use Amount, a tech platform from online lender Avant, to lend to consumers digitally.

“The U.S. unsecured personal loan market is growing at 20% annually, surpassing $125 billion in balances,” says Pablo Sanchez, Regional Head of Retail Banking and Wealth Management for HSBC for North America.

Sanchez says that millions of consumers need loans for unexpected expenses, debt consolidation, or home improvements. The Avant platform can get funds to approved borrowers as soon as the next day.

TransUnion predicts that unsecured personal loans from all types of lenders will rise to an all-time high of $156.3 billion by the end of 2019.

“Originations will remain at healthy levels across all risk tiers due to more lenders participating in the personal loan market,” says the credit bureau.

“We see the continued benefit of lighter-touch regulation,” says Jason Laky, SVP and Leader, Consumer Lending. “Personal loans have reemerged as a staple of the American consumer’s financial portfolio.” Laky says that many of these unsecured loans are offered by non-bank fintech lenders that make it much easier for consumers by offering an online application processes.

Lane Martin, Partner at CAPCO, who recently headed a report on the subject, says the speed of obtaining credit also appeals to consumers. In addition, unsecured loans can sometimes be cheaper than credit cards. For traditional lenders, using digital lending to build connections to consumers can pay off in later cross sales, the report points out.

Read more here.

Tap Home Equity Loans

Six Major Trends in Lending for Financial Marketers this Year

The forecast for most forms of consumer credit is good. Lending volume, growth in balances, and overall performance look upbeat for the year ahead. Banks and credit unions will try new marketing strategies, explore new products, and experiment with new technologies. Over the next six-weeks, we’ll review major trends in consumer lending that financial marketers should watch closely.

#2 Tap Home Equity to Replace Slumping Mortgage Lending

Rising home prices and rising interest rates have depressed mortgage applications and originations in the last couple of quarters.

CoreLogic reports that U.S. homeowners with mortgages have seen their home equity increase by 9.4%, year over year, as of the third quarter of 2018. That comes to $775.2 billion that can be tapped via home equity lending. CoreLogic says that the average homeowner gained about $12,400 in equity in the first three quarters of 2018.

HELOCs and home equity loans are a business that institutions can build on top of their mortgage portfolio, making it easier to find prospects. For those who can qualify, home equity credit is typically the lowest-rate way to borrow.

However, one result of the past financial crisis, according to Joe Mellman, SVP and Leader of TransUnion’s mortgage line of business, is that “we have a half-generation of consumers who have little knowledge of home-equity credit.” Between lower levels of equity and tightened credit standards, for many, he explains, home equity borrowing wasn’t an option.

So herein lies a challenge — and opportunity — for bank and credit union marketers. “There’s a ten-year gap in education about home equity credit,” says Mellman, “and it’s going to take a while to get filled.”

Read more here.